[Law-envtlcert] FW: Agricultural Act of 2014 (the Farm Bill) information request

Hsu, Shi-Ling shsu at law.fsu.edu
Thu Sep 22 10:19:23 EDT 2016


Dear students,

See below and attached, for some information on participating in a new project called the National Law School Farm Bill Research Consortium, which aims to produce advice on reauthorization of the Farm Bill.

Shi-Ling

From: Food Law Issues for Law Professors [mailto:FOODLAWPROFS at LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Emily Broad Leib
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 9:53 PM
To: FOODLAWPROFS at LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Agricultural Act of 2014 (the Farm Bill) information request

Hi all,

This email chain was a great reminder to announce the launch of a new project we are conducting with several of our colleagues on this list—the National Law School Farm Bill Research Consortium. The Consortium aims to leverage and expand the expertise of our partners by learning together and conducting coordinated research on various facets of the farm bill. Our main goals are learning together about the key issues facing the farm bill, identifying new and supporting existing good ideas to improve the farm bill, and building a shared platform that creates opportunities for us and other law professors and students to engage in this and future farm bills. I’m attaching a one-page flyer on the project with more information on the partners.

Because one of our main goals is to build capacity around the farm bill among food and agricultural law professors, we are eager to share some of the resources we are building with all of you. Please be in touch if you are interested, and I will keep you all updated as the year progresses about the best way to access the materials that we are creating and compiling.

In addition, the project will provide law students throughout the country—especially those without similar opportunities at their home institutions—with an opportunity to engage in farm bill research working with us and the Food Law Student Network. This opportunity is the Farm Bill Research Scholars Program and will run in parallel with the larger farm bill project. Student “Research Scholars" will conduct supplemental research to support the work of Consortium partners and bolster the Consortium’s mission of elevating farm bill research across legal academia. We will provide supervision in cases where students can’t find someone to supervise their work at their own school. The application for students, which contains more detailed information can be found here<https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScZuATmj-HhBBvVXlg4rXaCa8Ks1trc0dQvZpgjh-uuq7L0Tw/viewform>. Please let your students know of this amazing opportunity to work with some of the best scholars in our field!

I hope that this project will be of interest to many of you. Please let me know if you want to learn more, and I will also plan to keep this list updated as there are opportunities to engage.

Best,
Emily


Emily M. Broad Leib
Assistant Clinical Professor of Law
Director, Food Law and Policy Clinic
Deputy Director, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation
Harvard Law School
(P) 617-390-2590
ebroad at law.harvard.edu<mailto:ebroad at law.harvard.edu>


From: Food Law Issues for Law Professors [mailto:FOODLAWPROFS at LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Susan Schneider
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 8:09 AM
To: FOODLAWPROFS at LISTSERV.UARK.EDU<mailto:FOODLAWPROFS at LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Subject: Fwd: Agricultural Act of 2014 (the Farm Bill) information request

I just replied to Jennifer's request and Laurie's resource suggestions, but then wondered if others might be interested in these thoughts on farm programs and transitioning away from commodity crops. If so, my reply is forwarded below.

Susan



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Susan Schneider <sas.susan at gmail.com<mailto:sas.susan at gmail.com>>
Date: Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 7:02 AM
Subject: Re: Agricultural Act of 2014 (the Farm Bill) information request
To: Jennifer Pomeranz <jenniferpomeranz at gmail.com<mailto:jenniferpomeranz at gmail.com>>
Hi Jennifer,
I have a few new farm bill resources posted on my website<http://www.foodfarmingsustainability.com/economic-support-to-agriculture> including a 2015 CRS analysis, Dennis A. Shields, Farm Safety Net Programs: Background and Issues (Aug. 2015).  And, I just prepared a short analysis of the Marketing Loan Assistance Programs to show my class that there are still payments that are "coupled" with the supported commodity crops.  That's posted as well. Because certificates issued under this program are not subject to payment limitation rules, this program has been beneficial to very large farms, but it doesn't get much media attention.

As my class and I discussed, however, most commodity crop farmers continue to plant corn and soybeans for reasons that transcend the farm programs and crop insurance (which has been dramatically expanded to cover a lot more crops).  These farmers have the investment in very expensive equipment that is specialized for commodity crop production. They have the knowledge base to know how to grow it. These crops can be stored and marketed later.  And, even aside from farm programs, with high prices of late, profits have been very good.

Speaking specifically about the midwest commodity row crop farmer, asking a corn/soybean farmer to shift to growing fruits and vegetables is a major shift that is fraught with risk. They don't have the expertise in varieties, nutrient needs, pest concerns, inputs, etc., and their extension agent or input supplier probably does not either. They don't have the right equipment.  They don't have easy access to labor, and they might not have a ready market to sell the highly perishable crop.

So the shift to producing more fruits and vegetables is a lot bigger issue than the farm bill. I think it will take time (a gradual shift, a few acres at a time), horticultural support & training, incentives (which may be opposed by existing F&V producers), better access to labor (which is also a very complicated issue), better access to markets, and a new generation of young farmers interested in change.  I also think that a shift to other commodity crops such as oats, sunflowers, lentils, chick peas, etc. may be a more realistic path for most corn and soybean farmers than a total shift to fruits and vegetables. Similarly, a shift to producing organic commodity crops is needed to meet market needs.

Laurie suggested some great crop insurance resources, and I just posted links on a sidebar<http://www.foodfarmingsustainability.com/economic-support-to-agriculture>. Thanks, Laurie.

Best,
Susan

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 3:43 AM, Jennifer Pomeranz <jenniferpomeranz at gmail.com<mailto:jenniferpomeranz at gmail.com>> wrote:
Hi all- can anyone please recommend articles, briefs, papers etc. (that are not legally technical) about the state of agriculture since the 2014 Farm Bill? Specifically my class is looking to understand how the shift from direct subsidization of corn/soy/wheat has changed or not changed the agriculture landscape and if the new bill is encouraging the growth of fruits/vegetables etc. or if it is really the status quo just shifted to crop insurance.
Thank you,
Jennifer
..............................................
Jennifer L. Pomeranz, JD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Interim Chair, Department of Public Health Policy and Management
College of Global Public Health
New York University
41 East 11th Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003
jlp284 at nyu.edu<mailto:jlp284 at nyu.edu>



--
Susan A. Schneider
William H. Enfield Professor of Law
Director, LL.M. in Agricultural & Food Law
Face-to-face and distance education
University of Arkansas School of Law
Fayetteville, AR

(479) 575-4334<tel:%28479%29%20575-4334>
(479) 839-4058<tel:%28479%29%20839-4058> (home)
(479) 466-6361<tel:%28479%29%20466-6361> (cell)
sas.susan at gmail.com<mailto:sas.susan at gmail.com>

http://www.agfoodllm.com/
http://twitter.com/aglawllm
Author, Food, Farming & Sustainability



--
Susan A. Schneider
William H. Enfield Professor of Law
Director, LL.M. in Agricultural & Food Law
Face-to-face and distance education
University of Arkansas School of Law
Fayetteville, AR

(479) 575-4334
(479) 839-4058 (home)
(479) 466-6361 (cell)
sas.susan at gmail.com<mailto:sas.susan at gmail.com>

http://www.agfoodllm.com/
http://twitter.com/aglawllm
Author, Food, Farming & Sustainability
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